Arts Instructional Guide: Theatre v.1
For Classroom Teachers, Arts Teachers and Arts Community Partners
Blueprint for Theatre K-6
Theatre allows a community to tell its stories.

Theatre Blueprint
Word doc.
Grade Kindergarten
Focus: We use our imaginations in drama.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: The actor’s tools are body, voice and imagination.
How do we use our imaginations to tell stories?
Performance Task:  While listening to your teacher, use body and imagination to go on an adventure.  As you visit different places, there will be problems that you need to solve.  Sample script suggested by Sensory Journey Story from Development Through Drama by Brian Way, Humanities Press

5.2

1.1
Module 2
Stories in Action: We pantomine stories with imaginary characters and settings.
How do we bring stories to life?
Performance Task:  Work with a group to panomime a character in a nursery rhyme story and perform it for your class

2.2
5.2
Module 3
Theatre in the World: We can use theatre to tell a story.
Why does the same story change when different people tell it?
Performance Task:  Working with a small group, choose a story from a certain culture or time period and use movement and voice to become your character in the story.   Perform it for your classmates.

3.1

5.1

Module 4
Playmaking: We share what we have learned with a small audience.
How do you make a story into a play?
Performance Task:  Working with a small group, perform a familiar story for the class. Select costume pieces and props for the performance.

5.2

2.3
Module A
Attending Live Theatre: Theatre is live! The audience is a part of the play.
How is going to see a play different than going to see a movie or watching television?
Performance Task:  Show appropriate audience behavior at a live theatre performance.  Discuss with your class the difference between real and imaginary characters and between actors and the roles they play.
4.1
1.2


NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards



Grade 1
Focus: Everyone has a story to tell.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: Theatre brings stories to life.
Why do we share stories?
Performance Task:  Listening to your teacher,use the actor’s tools and five senses to take an imaginary journey.  while on the journey use your body, voice and imagination to react to the characters and problems in the setting.  Verbally respond to quesions about your journey. 

2.1

1.1, 5.2
Module 2
Stories in Action: Stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end.
Why do stories need a beginning, a middle and an end?
Performance Task:  Working with a group, use tableau to present the beginning, middle and end of a story that you know.  Use pantomime and improvisation to bring the tableau to life.

2.2
2.1
Module 3
Theatre in the World: We all have stories to tell.
Why are stories used to explain ideas?
What are my own stories that I can tell?
Performance Task:  Working with a small group, dramatize a stroy from another content area with clear plot (beginning, middle, end), problem,  characters and setting.


5.1
1.2, 2.2
Module 4
Playmaking: We share our stories to teach and entertain.
How do stories teach and entertain us at the same time?
Performance Task:  Working with a small group, dramatize a fable using simple props, costume and set pieces.  Present your play for the class.  In your journal, draw a picture of the props, costumes and set pieces that you used in your presentation.

3.2

5.2

Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience talks about how the play makes them feel.
Why do we talk about how plays make us feel?
Performance Task:  Attend a live performance. Draw a picture of your favorite part of the play and tell why you liked it.  Explain how you felt about the play.


4.2

4.1

NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards


Grade 2
Focus: We tell stories through theatre.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: An ensemble is a group of actors working together.
Why is it important for actors to work together?
Performance Task:  Work with an ensemble to build an improvisational machine representing a theme (e.g. courage, friendship, kindness) utilizing cooperative skills and all of the actor’s tools.

2.1

5.1
Module 2
Stories in Action: Stories from different places and times are about people working out similar problems.
Why are many stories from different cultures around the world about the same type of people and problems?
Performance Task:  Working as a part of an ensemble, improvise scenes or stories, that have a universal character.  In your journal, identify the universal character and the message or moral.  NOTE:  A universal character is a character that is found in many stories.

3.2
4.3
Module 3
Theatre in the World: People have always told stories to explain things.
How do stories help us understand things?
Performance Task:  Working as a class, create and perform a nature myth with a clear beginning, middle and end.  Discuss with your classmates the message or moral of the myth.

4.3
1.1. 5.1

Module 4
Playmaking: We improvise to create stories with character, setting and conflict.
How do we use theatre to tell stories?
Performance Task:  Working in an ensemble, dramatize a story, such as a folktale or a story from personal experience, for the class.  Work cooperatively to choose a job needed to present the play.

5.1

5.2
Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience identifies elements of the play that help to tell the story.
How do actors in a play help us understand the meaning of the story?
Performance Task:  Attend a live performance. Choose a character from the play, and in your journal write two things the actor did to make the character seem real.  Tell what you think the message of the play was.

4.1

4.2, 4.3


NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards



Grade 3
Focus: Theatre helps us understand the world around us.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: Actors make creative choices by understanding the use of body, voice and imagination.
How do actors make creative choices about their work?
Performance Task:  Working with a partner, choose a setting and two characters. Through improvisation, create a problem for the characters and a way to solve it. Identify the 5 Ws in the scene: who, what, when, where and why. Present the scene to classmates.
2.1
 1.1, 5.2
Module 2
Stories in Action: Stories from around the world have universal characters, conflicts and themes.
How does theatre help us understand the world around us?
Performance Task:  Working with a partner, create and perform a scene that shows traits of a universal theme (for example, a fool can be easily fooled, good things come in small packages, one good deed deserves another, if you want a friend be a friend). In your journal identify one universal theme.
3.2
2.1, 5.1
Module 3
Theatre in the World: Theatre has origins in myth, storytelling and ritual.
Why are myths, stories and rituals adapted into theatre pieces?
Performance Task:  Work with the class to create and perform a ritual based on Native American culture. 
3.1
2.1, 5.1

Module 4
Playmaking: Working together, we can create plays based on nature and human experience.
How do you know when a personal story would make an intresting theatrical presentation?
Performance Task:  In small groups, tell your own story based on a family ritual. The group will choose one story. With your ensemble, perform that story using basic blocking and stage areas.
2.2
2.1, 5.2
Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience evaluates theatrical elements of the play that help to tell the story.
Why is it important to look at each of the 5 Ws when evaluating a story?
Performance Task:  With your class, develop a rubric to evaluate a play you plan to attend.  Base your rubric on the 5 Ws. Use the rubric to write a critique about how well the play develops character (who), setting (where and when) and conflict (what and why).
4.1
1.2

NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards



Grade 4
Focus: Theatre has a rich history in California.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: Actors use theatre strategies to create character.
How do actors become characters?
Performance Task:  Working with a partner, choose two characters from a familiar story.  Create a “new” scene to perform through improvisation. Demonstrate the emotional traits of your character through gesture and action.
NOTE: A “new” scene is one not originally written but that could have happened in the story.

2.1
1.1, 1.2
Module 2
Stories in Action: California has a rich heritage of stories based on distinctive historical characters.
Why do the stories of early California characters provide great material for actors?
Performance Task:  Become part of a wax museum tableau of an event from California history.  Come alive and perform a scene as that character.
5.1
2.1, 2.3
Module 3
Theatre in the World: Theatre draws upon the many storytelling traditions of California.
Why do different cultural groups tell similar stories in such a variety of ways?
Performance Task:  Working with an ensemble, adapt and perform a short story using a storytelling tradition and style that comes from one of the diverse cultures of California.
3.1
2.3
Module 4
Playmaking: We can dramatize events in California history.
How does theatre help us to understand the past and the present?
Performance Task:  Work with an ensemble to dramatize an event in California history and perform it for an audience.
5.1
5.3

Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience critically analyzes elements of the play that help to tell the story.
Why are critiques of performances created?
Performance Task:  Develop criteria to evaluate the actor’s characterization, diction, pacing, gesture, and movement for a live theatre performance. Use the criteria to write a critique of the performance and tell how it made you feel.
4.1
4.3


NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards



Grade 5
Focus: Unique styles have developed in American theatre.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: Dramatic stories incorporate exposition, character, conflict, climax and resolution.
What makes a story dramatic?
Performance Task:  Adapt a story, folktale, legend or myth into a scripted short play.  The play should have an antagonist, protagonist, clear exposition, conflict, climax, and resolution. Include simple costumes, setting, and props.
2.3
1.1, 1.2
Module 2
Stories in Action: Theatre celebrates our different cultures and our common humanity.
How can we learn about a society through it’s stories?
Performance Task:  Working with an ensemble, explore several stories about people seeking a new life in America.  Select one story to dramatize. Design and select/create sets, props and costumes.
2.1
3.1, 3.2
Module 3
Theatre in the World: Musical theatre is one of America’s greatest contributions to world theatre.
How does society influence American theatre?
Performance Task:  Working with an ensemble, participate in a scene from an American musical that includes spoken dialogue and a choreographed song. Reflect upon the theme and ideas of your American musical scene in your journal.
3.4
2.3
Module 4
Playmaking: A class can be a theatre company.
How does a theatre company function?
Performance Task:  Work with your class to create a theatre company and perform a melodrama. In your journal, compare/contrast different types of early American theatre.
2.3
3.4, 5.2
Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience interprets dramatic and technical elements of the play.
Why are both dramatic and technical elements important in a critique?
Performance Task:  Develop criteria for critiquing the work of actors, director, writer, and technical artists in a theatrical performance. Using the vocabulary of the theatre, write a critique of the performance you attended. 
4.1
1.1


NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards



Grade 6
Focus: Theatre is integral to every culture.

             
Enduring Understandings
Assessed
Standards
Module 1
Foundation: We draw upon self-knowledge to create multi-dimensional characters.
Why do actors need a keen understanding of themselves and others?
Performance Task:  Create an original monologue based on text, subtext, and context. Perform the monologue demonstrating your character’s complexity, depth, objective and motivation.
2.3
2.1, 2.2
Module 2
Stories in Action: Theatre can be used to represent knowledge to persuade and to educate.
How has theatre influenced humanity?
Performance Task:  Working with an ensemble, choose an appropriate topic and create a brief persuasive scene.  In your journal identify how production values can manipulate mood.
5.1
1.2
Module 3
Theatre in the World: Theatre of today has traditions rooted in the historical cultures of Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas.
How does cultural diversity help us to create compelling theatre experiences?
Performance Task:  Working with a partner or a small group, differentiate the theatrical traditions of cultures throughout the world. Record your findings. Select one culture and write a script demonstrating one distinguishing characteristic of that culture’s theatrical tradition.
3.2
3.1
Module 4
Playmaking: We draw upon many theatre traditions to produce plays.
How can theatre traditions help us create new works?
Performance Task:  Work with an ensemble to write and perform a scene that includes monologue, dialogue, action, and setting together with a range of character types. In your journal, use the vocabulary of theatre to describe this theatrical experience.
2.3
1.1

Module A
Attending Live Theatre: The audience analyzes the impact of the play.
How can theatre change understanding or beliefs?
Performance Task:  Write a critique of a live theatre, television, or film performance you have experienced.  Evaluate the effectiveness of the creative choices made by the director and the technical artists. Describe how the production values manipulated your mood as an audience member.
4.1
1.2, 4.2


NOTE: Standards in bold are Essential Standards




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