A Webquest for Library Students. Who Was Dewey?
How will learning this numbering system help me throughout school and adult life?


By
Marsha Johanning


Table of Contents:
Overview
Introduction
    • 
Task
    • 
Process
    • Process - Step by Step
    • Step One: Learning about Melvil Dewey
    • Step Two: Learn about Dewey's Classifications
    • Step Three - Book Scavenger Hunt
    • Step Four: Make a booklet
Resources
    • 
Evaluation
    • Evaluation - Booklet
Conclusion
    • 
Teacher Page
    • 
Credits
    • 
Topic:
Dewey Decimal System
Themes:
Classification
Dewey Decimal System
Inquiry
Library
Project-Based Learning
Research
WebQuest
Focus Content Area:
Technology

Secondary Content Area:
English/Language Arts
Grade Level:
All


Overview:
The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC, also called the Dewey Decimal System) is a system of library classifications developed by Melvil Dewey in 1876. This system organizes books on library shelves in a specific order that makes it easy for you to find any book and return it to its proper place. By going through this WebQuest, you will be able to answer:

How will this numbering system help me throughout school and my adult life?

Did you know the whole Dewey Decimal System is based on the number 10?

You will learn about each of the main categories, subcategories, and subdivisions and be able to locate a specific book when you finish this Webquest.


Introduction:




Have you ever been frustrated when you go into a library to look for a book and didnít know where to begin looking? So how will learning the Dewey Decimal Classification help you throughout school and your adult life?

When you finish this Webquest not only will you be able to find the book, you will be able to find it in almost any library you enter and you will be able to teach others how to find books in libraries!


Task:




Hereís what you get to do!
When you finish this WebQuest, you will not only know the Dewey System and find any book, you will also be able to help others learn it.


Process:

Process - Step by Step

The Dewey Decimal Classification helps us organize our library by fiction and nonfiction and provides a breakdown of specific areas of nonfiction books.  This makes it easy to research and gather information about specific topics. Since this is a standard used in most libraries, by learning it in your early years you will use it throughout the rest of your life.





Step One: Learning about Melvil Dewey

Find out who created this system we use by clicking here and here.  Answer the following questions.

  1. What was his name?
  2. Where and when was he born?
  3. What type of job did he have?
  4. How old was he when his classification system?
  5. Name one interesting fact about Dewey.



Step Two: Learn about Dewey's Classifications

Click here to read a story about Dewey and the Alien to help you understand the classification system. Here is a chart of the Dewey Decimal Classification.


Dewey Decimal Classification Chart

000-Computers, Information, General Reference 100-Philosophy & Psychology  200-Religion 300-Social Sciences  400-Language 
500-Science  600-Technology  700-Arts & Recreation  800-Literature 900-History & Geography
 




Step Three - Book Scavenger Hunt

Roles:

You and your partner will decide which role you will take, then work together to complete the following chart.

Below are a list of callnumbers.  Print this page (word doc) then find a book for each call number and write the title of the book and the Dewey Category in the proper blanks.

Call Number Book Title Dewey Category
976.8    
599    
323.6    
812    
612    
551    
398    
428.1    
179    
004.6    
291.2    

 




Step Four: Make a booklet

You and your partner will each make a booklet. You will need
Remember we have discussed how our concluding sentence restates our topic sentence. When you have learned about all the different categories and your booklet is complete, share it with your partner and the class. Use the rubic to be sure you have completed all the requirements for your booklet. The rubric can be found on the evaluation page.

Resources:



Melvie Dewey Biography Information

http://www.oclc.org/dewey/resources/biography/

http://www.booktalking.net/books/dewey/

Alien Story

http://library.thinkquest.org/5002/Alien/alien.htm

Dewey Decimal Classification Chart

Book Scavenger Hunt Chart

Library Books

The Shelf Elf by Jackie Mims Hopkins

What Marion Taught Willis by Brook Berg

Art Supplies and Paper for Booklet



Evaluation:

Evaluation - Booklet

 

 

Beginning

1

Developing

2

Accomplished

3

Exemplary

4

Score

 

 

Illustrations of each Dewey Classification show recognizable detail
 
GLE Product and Performance: Select and apply three-dimensional media, techniquest, and processes to communicate ideas and solve challenging visual art problems.
Drawings show minimum of detail, but are recognizable.
Drawings show some detail and appropriate coloring for the classification depicted.
Drawings show detail and coloring appropriate to the classification depicted.
Drawings show detail and coloring appropriate to the classification depicted and show an understanding of the categories.

 

 

Student handwriting is readable and demonstrates appropriate use of capital letters and punctuation.
 
GLE Writing:
2. Compose well-developed test using standard English Conventions.

 

Student handwriting is readable and has appropriate spacing between words.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows some correct usage of capitals and punctuation.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows correct usage of capitals and punctuation.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows advanced usage of capitals and punctuation.

 

 

Student writing contains three to five appropriate facts about each classification.

GLE Writing: 1. Apply the writing process when composing text, 3. Write effectively in various forms and types of writing. 

GLE Information Literacy: 1. Develop and apply effective research process skills to gather, analyze and evaluate information.

Student writing contains less than three to five appropriate facts about each classification.
Student writing contains three to five facts about each classification.
Student writing contains three to five appropriate facts about each classification.
Student writing contains more than three to five detailed facts about each classification.

 

 

Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly.
GLE Listening and Speaking: 1.  Develop and apply effective listening skills and strategies
GLE Processes of Governmental Systems -resloving problems
 
Student was not able to cooperate, share ideas, contribute ideas, or speak kindly to their partner.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly some of the time.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly most of the time.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly all of the time.



Conclusion:



Now that you a basic idea about the Dewey Decimal Classification see if you can extend your learning by going to these sites.

http://library.thinkquest.org/5002/

http://frank.mtsu.edu/~vvesper/dewey2.htm

Watch this Power Point:

http://t4.jordan.k12.ut.us/grade_level/library/lesson_resources/understand_dewey.ppt



Teacher Page:



Introduction

This WebQuest is designed to provide young learners with practice accessing information on the web while providing them the opportunity to learn about Dewey Decimal System.  It is designed to use as a supplement to a normal Literacy curriculum that provides learning about different uses of information and placing that information within a frame of reference

The Learner

The lesson is designed for elementary students. It does not require adult help if students are independent readers  It could also be appropriate for upper level students if it meets the curriculum standards for that grade level.

Curriculum Standards

This WebQuest lesson would meet standards in the area of Communication Arts that deal with the classification of information and presentation of that information. It also provides practice in finding information online and within the library.

Directions for Use

To introduce this lesson, the teacher should read aloud or have available for student use a copy of The Shelf Elf Helps Out by Jackie Mims Hopkins or What Marion Taught Wills by Brook Berg. After reading the book, the students are ready to be taught the process involved in using the format of this WebQuest.  

The teacher will need to have supplies available to make the book that the students need to complete. It would be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the evaluation rubric below before you talk to them about the book, so that you set the quality standards that fit you and your students.

Evaluation
Students will be assessed individually based on their ability to work with their partner and on the quality of the book that they produce. The student-created book should include the following elements:

The following rubric will be used to assess the student created booklet.

 

 

Beginning

1

Developing

2

Accomplished

3

Exemplary

4

Score

 

 

Illustrations of each Dewey Classification show recognizable detail
Drawings show minimum of detail, but are recognizable.
Drawings show some detail and appropriate coloring for the classification depicted.
Drawings show detail and coloring appropriate to the classification depicted.
Drawings show detail and coloring appropriate to the classification depicted and show an understanding of the categories.

 

 

Student handwriting is readable and demonstrates appropriate use of capital letters and punctuation.

 

Student handwriting is readable and has appropriate spacing between words.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows some correct usage of capitals and punctuation.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows correct usage of capitals and punctuation.
Student handwriting is readable, correctly spaced and shows advanced usage of capitals and punctuation.

 

 

Student writing contains three to five appropriate facts about each classification.

 

Student writing contains less than three to five appropriate facts about each classification.
Student writing contains three to five facts about each classification.
Student writing contains three to five appropriate facts about each classification.
Student writing contains more than three to five detailed facts about each classification.

 

 

Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly.
Student was not able to cooperate, share ideas, contribute ideas, or speak kindly to their partner.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly some of the time.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly most of the time.
Student worked well with partner by cooperating, sharing ideas, contributing ideas, and speaking kindly all of the time.



Credits:



"Do We" Really Know Dewey http://library.thinkquest.org/5002/

The Shelf Elf by Jackie Mims Hopkins

What Marion Taught Willis by Brook Berg

Sharon Sumner for assisting in the completion of this project

My eCoach, Barbara Bray, for providing an excellent template and instruction for compiling a webquest.